Nature works in mysterious ways. And one really interesting oddity of nature is the so called whale tail that juts into the Pacific Ocean on Costa Rica’s Southern Pacific Coast. This giant rock and sand formation not only has the distinct shape of a whale’s tail, but is located in the exact spot where hundreds of humpback whales congregate each year. In this post, we’ll let you know how to see this famed whale beacon for yourself.

 

The Whale Tail at Uvita’s Marino Ballena National Park

About the Whale Tail

Costa Rica’s famous whale tail is located in the small town of Uvita, about an hour south of Manuel Antonio and is part of Parque Nacional Marino Ballena (the National Marine Whale Park). This national park, one of only two national marine parks in the country, consists of 270 protected land acres (110 hectares) and 13,200 acres (5,375 hectares) of preserved ocean. The delicate ecosystems that the park protects include things like mangroves, coral reefs, beaches, and whale-breeding grounds. The whale tail itself is a result of converging currents. These currents deposit sand on top of the rock formations to create the unique, tail-shaped pattern.

If you are planning a visit, the greater area is known as the Costa Ballena (Whale Coast) and consists of three towns, Dominical, Uvita, and Ojochal. For more information about this stretch of coastline, including some hotel and activity recommendations, check out our post all about it.

Access

The cool thing about Uvita’s whale tail is that it can be enjoyed from many different vantage points. Here are the three best ones:

The Bird’s Eye View

The first way to enjoy the whale tail is from above. Although some people might catch a glimpse if they are flying on a small plane to or from Drake Bay or Puerto Jimenez (see cover photo) on the Osa Peninsula, an easier way is to just drive into the hills. Since the Costa Ballena region has steep mountains very close to the ocean, you can see the fin-shaped sandbar from the balconies of many vacation rentals, hotels and B&Bs, or even from different spots along mountain roads. One easy place to see it is from the dirt road near Rancho La Merced (on the highway just north of Uvita). This long dirt road (4×4 required) eventually leads up to a village called San Josecito. But only a few minutes’ drive up the mountain, there is this gorgeous view.

 

The Whale Tail at Uvita’s Marino Ballena National Park

View from the road to San Josecito, north of Uvita.

 

Visiting the National Marine Park

Another way to enjoy the whale tail is to get up close and actually walk out onto the rocks and sand that make up the tail. This can be done only at lower tides, so check the charts to see what time you should go. To do this, you will have to pay admission at Marino Ballena National Park ($6 foreigners, ₡1,000 nationals) and walk from the main entrance in Uvita’s Bahia neighborhood. The park has three other entrances, on three different beaches, so be sure to start out from the right place at Playa Uvita. It only takes about 15-20 minutes to reach the point from the ranger station, but be forewarned, it can be extremely hot. There is absolutely no shade, so make sure to take a bottle of water and wear proper sun protection. For footwear, navigating on the uneven rocks can be tricky, and although we did it in flip-flops, it would be much easier in sturdy sandals or sneakers.

 

The Whale Tail at Uvita’s Marino Ballena National Park

Walking on the rocks can get a little treacherous so take your time.

 

From the tip of the whale tail, you can explore the thousands of little tide pools and rock formations that are normally covered at high tide. When we’ve gone out, we have seen all kinds of small fish, snails, and crabs in these pools. Some people even snorkel in the adjacent waters if conditions are good, but we haven’t been lucky enough to time it just right. In our opinion, though, the best part of visiting the tip of the whale tail is to look back to shore and take in the amazing mountain and beach views that make this area of Costa Rica so special.

 

The Whale Tail at Uvita’s Marino Ballena National Park

Nothing like a palm-tree-lined coast with jungle-filled mountains as a backdrop.

 

Go by Sea

A third way to enjoy the whale tail is to get out on the water. If you enjoyed the view from the tip of the tail, you’ll love the vantage point you can get from farther out in the ocean.

There are a few different options for this experience: One is to take a whale watching tour from Uvita. These tours will take you around the tip of the tail and to some of the small offshore islands nearby. The whales come for about nine months a year, so make sure to time it right. We wrote a whole post about this, so if you are interested, you can read it here (Whale Watching in Costa Rica).

 

Whale Watching in Costa Rica

A shot we took while whale watching near the tail.

 

Other tours out of Uvita include kayak and stand up paddle-boarding (SUP), which also go out around the tip of the tail and the islands. Or, for a glimpse under the water, take a diving or snorkeling tour. This area has a ton of underwater rock formations that are perfect for exploring. Tip: Be sure to inquire about visibility before booking a snorkel or dive tour as the water around the whale tail sometimes can be murky.

 

Uvita’s whale tail is a unique natural phenomenon that you won’t want to miss when visiting the Costa Ballena region of Costa Rica. When we first explored this area of Costa Rica back in 2007, we fell in love with it. Now we live close by! We’ll never forget trekking out to the tip of the whale tail for the first time, totally unprepared and sunburned, but in awe of the raw beauty of the ocean and lush green mountains. Hopefully this post will get you ready for your own adventure, and you’ll love it just as much as we do.

 

Have a question about visiting the Costa Ballena? Ask it below.

Looking for more information about this region of Costa Rica? Check out these posts: